MetroAppSite: Free, Open Source Metro-Style Website Templates for Your Windows Store Apps

Getting customers to notice and discover your Windows Store apps is hard, but you can reach users who aren’t inside the Windows Store using simple websites designed to promote your apps.

In addition, if your Windows Store app requires access to the Internet you are required by Windows Store policy to publish and link to a privacy policy hosted online (section 4.1.1.)

We decided to make life a little easier for Windows Store developers and built MetroAppSite – a fully responsive Metro-style website that uses Twitter Bootstrap and other standard frameworks to help developers promote their Windows Store apps.

And like most of our customers, we’re a .NET shop, so we built an ASP.NET MVC4 version of MetroAppSite too!

Features

Here are some of the great features that you get with MetroAppSite:

Metro theming and branding

Give your promotional website the same Metro look-and-feel that your users experience when they download your app from the Windows Store.

We even include a Microsoft Surface screenshot carousel for you to use to show off your Windows Store app’s look-and-feel.

metro-branding-metroappsite

MetroAppSite uses BootMetro and Twitter Bootstrap to give Windows Store developers an easy-to-modify, brandable template they can use to their own ends.

Fully responsive and touch/mobile-friendly

MetroAppSite’s CSS and design is fully responsive and touch-optimized out of the box. It looks great in full-sized web browsers and on mobile devices too!

metroappsite-mobile
Integrates seamlessly with third party services like Google Analytics and UserVoice

Unfortunately there isn’t a MarkedUp Analytics for websites yet, but in the meantime we made it dead-simple to integrate MetroAppSite with Google Analytics so you can measure your pageviews and visitors.

uservoice-logo

Additionally, we added hooks to integrate UserVoice directly into your app’s site so you can collect feedback and support tickets from users easily and seamlessly. UserVoice is what we used for our customer support at MarkedUp and we’ve had a great experience with it!

Templated privacy policy in order to make it easy for you to satisfy Windows Store certification requirements

Writing privacy policies can be a pain, so we made it easy for you to generate a privacy policy for your app using PrivacyChoice.org. You can paste these right into MetroAppSite and meet Windows Store certification requirements easily and thoroughly.

Demo Sites

We created some simple MetroAppSite deployments for you so can see what they look like in production:

Download

MetroAppSite is licensed under the Apache 2.0 license and is free for you to use in commercial or non-commercial projects.

Contribution

We happily accept pull requests via Github.

New Change in the Windows Store TOS: Any App with the Word “Metro” in the Title is Insta-Failed

Just in case you weren’t reading your Hacker News last week, you might have missed the news that Microsoft has decided to abandon the name “Metro” for its distinctive user interface that’s been used to power everything from Windows Phone 7, the new Xbox UI, the Windows Azure portal, and of course: Windows 8.

Suffice it to say, there were a lot of developers who were disappointed with the decision.

I thought it was rather spineless on Microsoft’s part to let Metro UI fade into the night – if Apple can spend $60 million putting an iPad trademark dispute to rest, then why wouldn’t Microsoft spend what it needs to keep the brand that’s heralding the new area of desktop and mobile application development on their flagship platforms.

So imagine our amusement today here at MarkedUp HQ when Erik reviewed the Windows Store “Before Your Sell Your App” guidelines and discovered this gem in the section regarding how to name your Win8 applications* (emphasis ours:)

Note  Make sure your app name doesn’t include the word metro. Apps with a name that includes the word metro will fail certification and won’t be listed in the Windows Store.

Looks like our friends at MetroTwit and other popular ported WP7 applications (many of which include the word “Metro” in the title) are going to have to undergo a similar rebranding to “the New Windows UI” or whatever we’re calling Metro now.

The Metro brand is a unifying force for developers building on Windows Phone and WinRT – after years of being promoted heavily by Microsoft as the new design language for their consumer-facing developer platforms it’s become both popular and self-descriptive.

Stripping the name away has ramifications beyond muddying Microsoft’s message to developers – it cripples the developers themselves who wanted to identify themselves with and support the Metro brand. Imagine if Apple caved and banned every application that began with a lowercase “i” at the start of it – it’s as severe a blow as that for a nascent and upcoming platform.

Abandoning Metro was the wrong thing to do – it ultimately won’t impact the developer opportunity for Windows 8 or the consumer app experience itself, but it completely undermines both Microsoft’s and their developers’ abilities to succinctly differentiate their WinRT / Windows Phone properties apart from everything else.

*Look mid-way through the page.